News


Showing  41 to 50 of 50 posts.

Water As A Human Right

Posted on in News
JiFW0spVXTJn9iAG.svg

The establishment of long term sustainable water supply schemes and the provision of adequate sanitation services require huge capital investments. These services are therefore very expensive and are not something that can be funded or done by individuals. The intervention of an elected Government is essential to facilitate water resources development, the provision of sanitation services and the recovery of the cost.

Read More...

Supporting The Government And The People Of Namibia To Prepare For Climate Change And Its Impacts

Posted on in News
qgG_PgoXWD1ER8Re.svg

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Namibia has been supporting the Government and People of Namibia with the implementation of development programmes and projects since 1990. Such programmes and projects generally aim to improve the protection and conservation of natural resources, particularly renewable ones that people depend on for daily survival, i.e. use for food and to secure incomes and other benefits – a conservation for development approach. To date, with generous support from the Global Environment Facility (GEF) the total investment is some N$705 million with a further N$180 million scheduled for 2016-2020.

Read More...

Nadeet Centre: We Practice What We Teach

Posted on in News
TzKXgjSzeEew0Cka.svg

Addressing climate change calls for multiple approaches. Nowadays there are so many messages that tell us what we should or should not do that it is often di cult to know what is right and what is wrong. The Namib Desert Environmental Education Trust (NaDEET) tackles climate change education through a “we practice what we teach” approach. Within this context, the complexity of climate change which can seem difficult to grasp becomes tangible through hands-on solutions.

Read More...

Introducing The Thinknamibia Campaign: Consolidating Environmental Awareness Efforts In Namibia

Posted on in News
Mrd6VK37hcGAvyFH.jpg

Namibia has an excellent legislative and policy backdrop for environmental protection and sustainable resource management. However, its economy is highly dependent on natural resources including diverse rangelands, arable land, mineral deposits, ecosystems and biodiversity. Economic and social development will be negatively affected with the challenges posed by climate change; especially with regard to water availability, food and livelihood security.

Read More...

Planing and Financing Climate-Smart Crop Cultivation

Posted on in News
ry1jS45A_9VVD3V3.jpg

Paulus Hamutenya takes a close look at the tomato plant in his field. With his hands he feels the texture of the stems and leaves on the plant – nodding with distinct approval at the combination of quality, colour and thickness. “The organic fertilizer we have tried out for the last 2 months is definitely working”, he remarks with inevitable pride.

Read More...

Gender and Climate Change Vulnerability in Namibia

Posted on in News
Y1Ugg_tuNdJBSEKv.jpg

In this article I intend to communicate why gender matters in climate change vulnerability assessments. I would like also to demonstrate with findings from my research work on gender and climate change in Namibia why it is vital to recognise gender differentiated vulnerabilities to impacts of climate change for effective and equitable adaptation.

Read More...

Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation: Milestones in Namibia's Climate Change Response

Posted on in News
KjRUY9QdtKISjWUk.jpg

 Namibia ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 1995. As a Non-annex 1 party to the Convention, Namibia is not obliged to reduce its Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. However the country’s dependence on energy from South Africa and its favorable conditions for renewable energy, makes the transition to a low carbon economy an important long-term strategy.

 

Read More...

The Cost Of Water

Posted on in News
q34pvQimR8PfdVJ5.svg

BY PIET HEYNS - DESERT RESEARCH FOUNDATION OF NAMIBIA (DRFN)  

Water in Namibia is free, but it also has a cost. This cost is the cost to supply water from its source to the tap of the user and does not include any cost for the water itself. The cost to supply water under the prevailing arid conditions in Namibia is very high and the therefore water is expensive. The trick is to understand why water is considered to be a free commodity, why water has a cost, why this cost is high and how this unavoidably high cost can be adjusted to make water more affordable for the consumer. The bottom line is that water has a cost and someone must pay for the supply of water otherwise a water service provider will go bankrupt and the service will have to be terminated, unless a “bailout” is provided.

Read More...

Driving Water Stewardship In Namibia

Posted on in News
9RUfw5mAmCiIlRQg.jpg

BY THINKNAMIBIA ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS

On the 1st of October, 2015, the Water Youth Namibia, Hanns Seidel Foundation (HSF) Namibia and Desert Research Foundation of Namibia (DRFN) co-hosted a public dialogue focused on the role of youth in addressing Namibia's water scarcity challenges. 

Water’s central role in the biosphere has long implied that several of the most important challenges confronting human development are related to fresh water. This has been true for decades and will only intensify without a change in the course of human water use.

Read More...

The Media Matter in a Warming World

Posted on in News
NOs9xfUtGRwWNhon.jpg

BY THINKNAMIBIA ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS

From the 27-28 August 2015, a Climate Change Media Training for Namibian Journalist was held in Windhoek. The training was initiated by the Media for Environment, Agriculture and Sustainable Development in Namibia (Mead-Namibia) and was funded by the Hanns Seidel Foundation (HSF) Namibia, through its Environmental Awareness and Climate Change Project. It was held at the Namibian Institute of Culinary Education (NICE) in Windhoek, Khomas Region. 

Read More...